IEEE 2021 NSS MIC

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Workshop: Challenges moving from the lab bench to clinical practice for nuclear medicine

Session chair: Yamaya , Taiga (National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Chiba, Japan); Watabe , Hiroshi (Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai, Japan)
 
Shortcut: WS-05
Date: Saturday, 23 October, 2021, 10:30 AM - 1:30 PM
Room: WS-01
Session type: Workshop

This Workshop is sponsored by: Canon Medical Systems


A lot of research developments have been done in nuclear medicine physics, but the way to clinical realization is not always straightforward. Why does this happen? What are factors that determine a successful breakthrough? Intuitively, the more innovative an idea is, the longer the route to its realization will be. However findings in physics and engineering applicable in medical fields are meaningful before the final long awaited outcome is handed to physicians. What are the roles of academia and public research institutions along the route? What are the roles of industry? How can technologies be transferred effectively from academia to industry? In this workshop, we will consider some keys to realize innovative ideas by introducing successful and on-going challenges in moving from the lab bench to clinical practice in nuclear medicine. Not only devices and software will be presented, but also topics in some radiopharmaceuticals will be introduced. Anyone who is interested in research and development of medical equipment as well as physicians who are expecting realization of the state-of-the art technologies are welcome to join.

Workshop organizers

  • Hiroshi Watabe, Tohoku University
  • Miwako Takahashi, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiation Science and Technology (QST)
  • Taiga YAMAYA, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiation Science and Technology (QST)

Contents

Click on an contribution to preview the abstract content.

10:30 AM WS-05-01

Introduction (#1617)

T. Yamaya1

1 National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Chiba, Japan

Abstract

A lot of research developments have been done in nuclear medicine physics, but the way to clinical realization is not always straightforward. Why does this happen? What are factors that determine a successful breakthrough? Intuitively, the more innovative an idea is, the longer the route to its realization will be. However findings in physics and engineering applicable in medical fields are meaningful before the final long awaited outcome is handed to physicians. What are the roles of academia and public research institutions along the route? What are the roles of industry? How can technologies be transferred effectively from academia to industry? In this workshop, we will consider some keys to realize innovative ideas by introducing successful and on-going challenges in moving from the lab bench to clinical practice in nuclear medicine. Not only devices and software will be presented, but also topics in some radiopharmaceuticals will be introduced. Anyone who is interested in research and development of medical equipment as well as physicians who are expecting realization of the state-of-the art technologies are welcome to join.

Keywords: Introduction
10:35 AM WS-05-02

From concept to clinic: lessons from the development of PET/CT

D. W. Townsend

National University of Singapore, Singapore

Over many decades, advances in the scientific and engineering fields have resulted in the transfer of technology into other related fields, and specifically for this presentation, translation into medical imaging. Although performance specifications for medical applications may be different, there are many common aspects with fields such as nuclear physics, including detectors, acquisition electronics, trigger and filtering requirements, data storage, image reconstruction and processing, and image display. This presentation will stress that it is essential to first understand the medical problem that is addressed by a new concept or approach before attempting to translate that concept into the clinic. Over the years, many concepts and designs have been explored and translated into clinical devices, sometimes successfully and sometimes not so successfully. One specific successful example, the PET/CT scanner, will be reviewed in detail and the lessons learned over many years from this exercise will be discussed. As will be seen, even concepts that successfully address a specific medical need may encounter substantial critical opposition before eventually being recognized as an important, and essential, contribution to the field of medical imaging.

11:05 AM WS-05-03

Toward clinical translation of novel PET system technologies (#1618)

C. S. Levin1

1 Stanford University, Radiology, Physics, Electrical Engineering, Bioengineering, Stanford, California, United States of America

Abstract

Recently we have completed research PET system designs that we plan to test in clinical pilot studies of cancer and neurological disorders In this talk we describe these innovative technologies, and some of the key steps involved to bring novel research instruments from the laboratory to the clinic.

Keywords: clinical translation
11:35 AM WS-05-04

Recent advances and future directions in clinical nuclear medicine (#1619)

T. Higuchi1, 2

1 University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
2 Okayama University, University, Japan

Abstract

The whole-body PET with F-18-FDG, a fluorinated glucose analog, is well-rooted as standard for molecular imaging of many kinds of cancers mainly for staging and restaging, but also for monitoring response to treatment. Recently, more specific PET radiotracers addressing tumor-specific protein expression at the cell can be utilized for specifically detecting cancer localization. Specific binding of radiopharmaceuticals to prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an example of ensuring early diagnosis of recurrent disease from prostate cancer. Furthermore, expand the clinical use of the novel molecular imaging agent is witnessed for therapeutic purposes through the introduction of beta-/alpha-emitting radionuclides. More potential options of molecular PET for novel cardiac and renal imaging based on our own research activities will be shortly presented.

Keywords: clinical nuclear medicine
12:05 PM WS-05-05

What nuclear medicine physicians really want (#1620)

M. Takahashi1

1 National Institutes for Quantum and Radiation Science and Technology (QST), Chiba, Japan

Abstract

One of the essential aims in clinical practice is reducing uncertainties in diagnosis and predicting prognosis. Nuclear medicine physicians put forth great effort towards this aim. However, issues can still arise from various factors, such as pharmacokinetics, scan and imaging processes, and differences in physician’s individual knowledge and experiences. The combination of PET and CT reduces one of the uncertainties related to the registration of PET and CT images. For example, PET-CT tells us whether the abnormal finding of the chest wall on the PET image exists in the pleural or the rib. In this workshop, I would like to explain the potential of medical imaging development to reduce uncertainty, improve diagnostic accuracy, and contribute to elucidating unexplained pathophysiology.

Keywords: nuclear medicine physicians
12:35 PM WS-05-06

Panel discussion


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